Shining A Light on Summertime Hair Color

Shining A Light on Summertime Hair Color

Hair by Marshall Lin 
The Desire for lighter hair color in the summertime is a strong one. While we strive for darker golden tans, we opt for lighter hues for our manes. But before you hit the salon to change up or just refresh your hair color for the summer, read on for Marshall’s guidelines because lighter is not always the way to go.
Summer is the season of sunshine. Under its rays, everything is bright and vivid; including your hair. The most important step in creating the perfect color is to create the best base so that your hair develops naturally under the sun.
In order to create the best base, consider the following two factors. “Hair naturally will look lighter in every angle under the sun,” says Marshall. Spending any time outside in the summer will lighten your hair, and at the beach the saltwater and heat will oxidize your color. In addition to the lightening effect, a stronger contrast will show up in your hair from the sun. Highlights will appear brighter while the stronger lighting will also reflect the different tones.
Color by Rogerio Cavalcante
Marshall has individualized advice based on your current color. If your hair is dark or black (a.k.a. naturally deep brown or black Asian hair), Marshall suggests some natural gently sun kissed highlights around your face. Ask your colorist for cooler tones, as warmer toned hues on dark hair tend to turn brassy in the sun.
 
If your hair is medium brown or dark blonde, you can just let it be. If you are happy with your color, stay with it because the sun will create naturally beautiful highlights.
” As for the summertime, the light outside is more intense and thus all colors look more diluted- Which is why a neon pink shirt doesn’t seems as intense during the summer as it does in winter. During summer, blonds should go for more of a golden, sandy, vanilla tone with more contrast from highlight. For brunettes, summer is the best time to go against their natural hair color- for instance a soft blond, honey or light caramel color ‘ David Michaud ,Color director from Frederic Fekkai
 
If your hair is light blonde, keep in mind that your hair will lighten at least one shade lighter from the sun. It is important to protect your color. Marshall suggests that you ask your colorist to tone your color one or a half level deeper or warmer. You can also add on color pigment to strengthen your hair and create a richer tone.
 
Hair color experts use the word tone to refer to warmer and cooler hues. Warmer tones include gold, chestnut, caramel, and strawberry blonde. Red, orange, and yellow are the foundation for these colors. Warmer tones can be universally flattering in the summertime. On the other hand, if you are aiming for more of a platinum blonde or ash brown, opt for a cooler tone which is based on gray, blue, or green. Again, if your hair is darker and veers towards the brassy side, a cool tone can combat the brassiness.
” For the summer you can go red nut it must be soft and warm. Especially for the very light skin complexion” Editorial Colorist Christophe Lamvenne from Fekkai Soho
Color by Christophe Lambenne 

‘ I do like the word “en-hance-ment”. This can make a great impact just making them feeling better in their own beauty ‘ Rogerio Cavalcante, Star colorist from Maria Bonita Salon NYC

If you are venturing towards Marshall’s “break the rules” colors such as pink, blue, or silver, go all out and follow your heart when picking the right shade.
 
So, remember to create the perfect base for your summer hair color. While you are basking in the sun and enjoying the glory days of summer, your highlights will also be in bloom.

Floral. Daydream for Rose & Ivy Journal Magazine/ Hair by Marshall Lin

 

Rose & Ivy Journal Magazine

Photographer by Alison Dulaney

Model- Allie Lewis from IMG model

Hair- Marshall Lin

Make up- Robert Reyes

Stylist-Ana Tess

read more please visit- www.roseandivyjournal.com

As winter approaches, your natural instinct is likely to color your hair darker. But I don’t think so.

As winter approaches, your natural instinct is likely to color your hair darker.

 

    But I don’t think so.

 

    In the winter, most of us would already wear a lot of black, grey or solid colors. So think about this. If you’re wearing a lot of darker colors, and your hair is dark, you may look a little dull.

 
Model Mariana Macki/ Color by Rogerio Cavalcante/ Haircut by Marshall Lin

   ‘ I don’t believe women should change hair colors as season does. Otherwise what would happen with the beautiful Scandinavians Blondes in the winters! Go Darker!? Never! ‘ Star Colorist Rogerio Cavalcante from Maria Bonita Salon

 

    Don’t be afraid to go lighter in the winter, since you won’t get a lot of sunlight reflection off your hair during the colder seasons.

 

 
Color by David Michaud 
 
Color by  Rogerio Cavalcante

   ‘ During the winter season, the sun casts a pretty white and grey light. Because of this , many people think that they have to change their hair color to be darker and warmer, but in fact the opposite is true, I recommend that, during the winter, blonds go to more of an ASHY/COOL blond- even ICY ‘ Celebrity Colorist David Michaud from Frederic Fekkai Soho

 

   Here are some things to keep in mind when coloring your hair (these are tips that go beyond the winter season)

 

1) When looking for the  best tone for your face, turn to your eyebrows, eye color and skin color, to find something complementary.

2) If your hair is already light, don’t be afraid to go platinum blonde or a cooler blonde.

3) Trust your hairstylist and colorist. Spend time to chat with them, so that you can make sure all of you are on the same page.

 

Marshall Lin.

Marshall Lin for Pamella Roland Fall/Winter 2017 #NYFW

Photo credit – Hal Horowitz

Hair- Marshall Lin for Frederic Fekkai

Styling- Erin Walsh

Makeup- Rick DiCecca for Artistry by Amway

Nails- Pattie Yankee

Jewelry- Chopard

Press- Purple PR

 

Written by Pauline Ma Editor at Large

An ode to artist Mark Rothko: Pamella Roland Fall/Winter 2017 swept the scene of Pier 59 Studios with a collection inspired by abstract expressionism and Rothko’s use of color and texture. Perfect for a chillier time, the pieces combined a variety of materials including double-faced cashmere, leather, and mesh organza, showcased in wintry shades of garnet, moss, aubergine, and amethyst, to name a few.

In signature Pamella Roland fashion, there areplenty of options when it comes to tailored separates with a modern edge. Classic floor-length evening silhouettes also commanded the runway as the run of show transitioned from subtler hues into richer, deeper shades. To no surprise, Fall/Winter 2017 certainly wasn’t without the meticulous detail of embroidery, sequins, sparkling crystals and alluring feathers. All in all a charming and elegant collection – there wasn’t one piece we wouldn’t wear.

Would You Rock Two-Tone Hair Like Selita Ebanks?

attends Samsung Hope for Children Gala at Cipriani Wall Street on June 7, 2011 in New York City.
attends Samsung Hope for Children Gala at Cipriani Wall Street on June 7, 2011 in New York City.

 

Selita Ebanks continues to show off her new two-toned pixie cut, stepping out at the Larry Crowne premiere in Hollywood on Monday night. She complemented the unique style with a fuchsia Marchesa mini and Christian Louboutin leopard-print shoes.

The 28-year-old actress and former Victoria’s Secret model debuted her two-tone coif June 7 at a charity gala in NYC.

Lately, Ebanks has been making some bold choices when it comes to her hair: In May, she swapped her long, flowing tresses for a chin-legnth bob and blunt bangs dyed a deep shade of red. Just weeks later, the star went back to her brunette roots but cropped her hair even shorter.

When going short, the rule of thumb is haircut first; dye job second. “Most people make the mistake of getting their color done before they receive their haircut,” says colorist Jamie Sanchez. “As a result the color gets cut out and impacts the appearance of both the color and the haircut.”

Section your hair into top and bottom layers. Keep the under layer dark for definition and, with a tone-on-tone approach to coloring, keep the top blonde section toward beige. The effect is “chic with strong definition” says stylist Marshall Lin.

full article please visit http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-style/news/would-you-rock-two-tone-hair-like-selita-ebanks-2011286