To Brush or not to brush: That is the question

 

photo credit by KaShing Lin
Article by Janet Bloom

 

To brush or not to brush: that is the question.

Hair brushing almost seems like a trend from the good old days. The old practice of brushing 100 strokes every evening before bed conjures up the image of Marsha Brady or any other 70’s or 80’s beauty icon sitting in front of a mirror stroking away. Yet, with so many brushes on the market that promise fuller, thicker, sexier, hotter, healthier, and the best hair ever; we may wonder if we actually need this tool.

Marshall believes in the foolproof combination of brushing AND combing your hair to achieve the best effect. “Combing separates the hair, while brushing puts it back together,” he says. Both combing and brushing, ultimately, contribute to a beautiful cascade of smooth hair. There are, however, different occasions when we should choose one over the other. As you go throughout your day combing and brushing your hair will fit into different aspects of your beauty routine.

 

Before you shower: Brush your dry hair to stimulate your scalp and evenly distribute the natural oils throughout your hair. This will make shampooing a smoother experience and help you to avoid knots while sudsing up and rinsing.

In the shower: A comb should be used in the shower to spread out conditioner. As it separates each strand of hair, the comb will aid in the absorption of the conditioner as well.

Before you blow dry: A comb is vital for achieving a beautiful blowout. It creates the foundation by removing knots in wet hair and laying the initial shape; so always comb out your hair before blow-drying.

During your blow dry: Only on DRY hair will the brush create the tension to promote shine and smooth out the shape. A natural bristle brush works the best. Marshall’s primer on choosinga brush  can be found in this link ‘ OLIVIA GARDEN’, ‘ YS PARK PROFESSIONAL ‘ ‘ Raincry Hairbrush

 

Daily brush out: Again, remember to brush dry hair only. Brush as needed whenever hair needs to be refreshed, smoothed, and shaped.

Always comb and brush your hair starting from the ends, and working towards the top. Knots are generally concentrated at the ends of your hair so starting from the bottom will createa smoother  path. Follow this rule of thumb for both combing and brushing. A gorgeous head of hair is only a comb and a brush away.

 

The Quick Fix Guide to Winter Hair

Hat hair, hair loss, dry scalp, and brittle hair are just a few complaints I hear during this time of the year. As the winds blow stronger and the chill sets in, clients always ask, “Is winter damaging to my hair and scalp?”
When the temperatures drop, loss of moisture and static electricity are two culprits behind most hair dilemmas. Two simple solutions can easily combat these issues.
1. Static Cling from Winter Attire
When walking around looking like you’ve been electrically shocked won’t do, all you have to do is add a little serum. The effects of all the friction from staticky fabrics from parkas, sweaters, scarves, and hats can be undesirable; but running some light serum through your hair will prevent the instant expansion once you come in from the cold. Pulling your hair back and keeping it place before putting on your winter gear will also prevent your hair from sticking up all over the place.
2. The Power Of the Hot Shower
While a hot shower, sauna, or soak in a warm jacuzzi provides a cozy respite from the cold, it also opens your hair cuticles, exposing them to dryness and static. By sealing the cuticle back, you can protect your hair. Simply wet a towel with cool water and apply it to your hair and scalp, following any warm water hair treatment. The cool water will reseal the cuticle, and keep it healthy and silky.
All you need is a little serum ( PAI SHAU Biphasic infasusion, Davines oi oil )) a towel and some cool water. Winter hair problems solved!
– Marshall Lin

10 Refreshingly Short Haircuts That Are Making Waves in 2018 – POPSUGAR

 

 

 

Collarbone Lob

Image Source: Getty / Michael Tran

The cut: Collarbone Lob

Celebrity Inspiration: Emma Stone

Description: “Emma’s cut is a collarbone-length, long-angle bob,” said celebrity and editorial hairstylist Marshall Lin. “The key for this cut is to create a soft edge with a razor or point-cutting techniqu while adding on long layers to soften that edge.”

Style it: Lin said, “Use Pai-Shau Royal Abundance Mousse ($26) initially for volume, then Pai-Shau Texture Dust ($24) close to the root, and follow with a lightweight and flexible hairspray.”

Who it works for: “This cut softens the face and bone structure and has a lot of freedom when styling. It not discriminate on hair texture, so women with straight, curly, or wavy hair can rock it,” said Lin.

’80s Fade

The cut: ’80s Fade

Celebrity inspiration:Katy Perry

Description: “This is a woman’s fade haircut that you saw back in the ’80s punk era,” said Lin. “To create, leave the top with a horseshoe section — the width will depend on the end of your eye bone. Many stylists will use a buzzer machine here, but I’d prefer using a scissor over comb to give a bit of a feminine kick for the fade and not be as extreme.”

Style it: “I’d use Davines This Is a Medium Hold Finishing Gum ($32) here and finish with Pai-Shau’s medium and flexible hold Sublime Hold Hairspray ($30).

Who it works for: This look works for someone who’s bold and daring and ready to embrace that rocker edginess.

Vintage Pixie

Image Source: Getty / Mike Pont

The cut: Vintage Pixie

Celebrity inspiration: Scarlett Johansson

Description: “This is a classically sexy short haircut worn by icons like Mia Farrow,” said Lin. “The key for this cut is to create that soft-edge hairline, leaving the top section about three inches of side-cut so that while it’s short, there is still room to style. The back needs to have a half-inch length from the hairline so you can still get the softness.”

Style it: “Styling this cut is a breeze,” noted Swayze. “On already straight hair, use a very small touch of Batiste XXL Plumping Powder ($9). When I say a touch, I mean it — this stuff is powerful and will be your new best friend. It adds immense texture for a fraction of other texturizing powders.”

Who it works for: “This is a more feminine short haircut that works for women who want to show off their features without losing the option to style,” said Lin.

 Midi-Lob With Curtain Bangs

Image Source: Getty / JB Lacroix

The cut: Midi-Lob With Curtain Bangs

Celebrity inspiration:January Jones

Description: “This is a medium-length bob with a soft bang. This haircut is soft, but you can still feel the volume and thickness,” said Lin. “You want to keep the length two inches below your chin or at the base of your collarbone. For bangs, create fringe angle and point-cut or razor cut for a straight line.”

Style it: Swayze said, “Apply some Bumble and Bumble Thickening Full Form Volume Mousse($17) on wet hair and roughly dry with a blow dryer. Use a 1-1/4 curling iron and wrap random pieces of hair around the barrel, some going forward, some going backward, to create that deconstructed wave. Follow up by using a touch of IGK Down and Out Dirty Spray ($14) to give it the perfect bedhead look.”

Who it works for: This cut works for someone who wants a feminine, not too-short but not too-long cut that can go glamorous or casual.

Full Article please visit https://www.popsugar.com/beauty/Hottest-Short-Haircuts-2018-44594199?stream_view=1#photo-44594200

Is Going To Bed With Wet Hair Bad For You?

woman with wet hair

Ever hear that going to bed with wet hair will make you sick? You’re not alone. It’s one of those pieces of old-school advice that gets passed down from generation to generation, along with the thought that plucking one gray hair causes three to grow back and that only teenagers get acne.

Some people prefer to wash their hair at night for whatever reason—it fits with their schedule, they love that snooze button or they’ve been doing it for years without really thinking about it. But does going to bed with wet hair really, truly, actually make you sick? And even if it doesn’t, does it harm your hair? We went to the experts to find if the advice actually holds up—or not.

Ask the Doctor: Will Going to Bed With Wet Hair Make You Sick?

According to Amber Tully, MD, a family-medicine physician at Cleveland Clinic, the idea that sleeping with wet hair can cause illness is an old wives’ tale. (Sorry, mom.) The common cold—think sniffling, congestion or a runny nose—is caused by a virus that is in no way related to how damp or dry your hair is. “You may feel physically cold if you sleep with wet or damp hair, but this will not cause illness,” says Dr. Tully. But people associate being sick with feeling physically cold, she explains, which is probably why this mistake is so prevalent.

The common cold is caused by a virus that is in no way related to how damp or dry your hair is.

On the other hand, going to bed with wet hair can cause an entirely different set of issues—for your scalp. “A chronically damp or wet pillow may become a breeding ground for bacterial or fungal infections, since the combination of warmth and moisture allows many fungal elements to thrive,” says Dr. Tully. That could result in seborrheic dermatitis—a.k.a. dandruff, the most obvious sign of which is a chronically red, itchy or flaky scalp.

Ask the Hairstylist: Will Going to Bed With Wet Hair Damage Your Hair? 

Going to bed with wet hair can also create extra work in the AM. “Sleeping with wet hair causes your hair to set, which means your hair will turn out whichever way you sleep on it,” says Marshall Lin, a stylist at Frédéric Fekkai SoHo Salon. “Your hair can get tangled during sleep, and those knots can be harder to get out without causing breakage to strands.” He also seconds the point about damage to the scalp—noting that it’s not just your pillow that’s the problem. “The moisture, oil and body heat from your scalp can cause buildup and lead to dry scalp or dandruff,” he says.

“Your hair can get tangled during sleep, and those knots can be harder to get out without causing breakage to strands.”

If you have no other options besides going to bed with wet hair, it’s worth taking a few extra steps to protect it. First, let your roots dry a little bit, which can help alleviate scalp issues. Then, “comb your hair well and apply a light, leave-in conditioner,” says Lin. “Since your hair will set overnight, you’ll want to go to sleep with it smooth and neat.” Lin recommends working Fekkai PrX Reparatives Leave-In Conditioner Spray through the mid-lengths to ends, which will help keep hair smooth. In the morning, comb your hair and quickly blast your roots with a hair dryer to ensure your scalp is completely dry. If your hair is wavy or curly, work a curl cream or oil through the ends—otherwise, you’re good to go.

 

While hitting the sheets with wet hair won’t kill you, it’s generally not a good idea for your hair and scalp. If time is the enemy at bedtime, we recommend a quick dry using the ultra-fast Harry Josh Pro Tools hair dryer. You can also dry and protect your hair at the same time with a fast-absorbing hair turban (it’s comfy enough to wear while sleeping). And—most important—choose the right brush or comb to detangle your wet strands, while minimizing breakage. Try The Wet Brush, which is designed especially for wet or damp hair.

Does your Hairstyle Make the Cut All Year Round?”

Model by Kate Herrington/ Hair by Marshall Lin
 
When the temperatures soar during the hot summer months, we may feel inclined towards chopping off our hair in order to keep cool. Is the summertime the perfect time to try out that Pixie look you’ve been contemplating? Perhaps, come June, you should trade your long tresses for a modern lob. Marshall’s take on this subject is quite the opposite.
 
According to Marshall, a surefire method for choosing the length of your hairstyle is to base it on the fashion of the season. The same outlook can be applied to choosing the right hair color. (Read more about choosing your color here)
 
In the summer, our wardrobes lighten up in many ways. We wear thinner fabrics and show more skin. Bare arms, shorter hemlines, exposed shoulders, and glimpses of midriff exude an air of freedom. This leaves room for long flowing hair; a gorgeous mane to frame that gorgeous figure. Your hair could be your best accessory. A glimpse of Alessandra, Adriana, or Taylor on the Victoria’s Secret runway is proof that long hair is the perfect complement to minimal clothing.
 
In the winter, fashion is a bit heavier. We cover ourselves in turtlenecks, heavy knits, scarves, and warm outerwear. Piling on layers can camouflage your figure; and the benefit of shorter hair is that it brings focus to your face. Also, in a sea of darker winter hues lighter hair color can highlight the best features of your face.
 
Hair by Marshall Lin
From an evolutionary perspective, our hair provides protection and warmth to our bodies. But above all, Marshall’s standpoint is that we should all choose the hairstyles that make us look the most beautiful season after season.
Model Link- Kate Herrington
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